Save the Date: Action at the Wyatt Detention Center, 8/13

Last month, Jews, immigrants and allies shut down the Wyatt Detention Center, where Rhode Island imprisons people in cooperation with ICE’s unjust detention and deportation policies. Next month, we can do it again.

The ties between climate justice and migrant justice are strong: people are leaving their homes because climate change is making it impossible for them to stay, and some of them are coming here only to be met with arrest and imprisonment, mistreatment, separation from their families, and murder. Many people fleeing climate-change-induced hardship come from countries that the US has continued to deliberately destabilize and exploit, in ways that contribute to climate change as well as other kinds of injustice, and land defenders and Indigenous people are also being murdered in their own countries because of these extractive practices! US residents can resist the cruel and fascist policies and practices that affect people when they try to leave conditions that our country helped create.


Here’s the form to indicate the level and kind of your participation (there are many roles and ways to participate, before and during, for people with many levels of experience and/or comfort with risk), and here are the relevant dates.


TOMORROW, 8/1, 7pm, 319 Broadway: Meeting for those who want to be more involved in planning the event. The entrance is street-level and wheelchair accessible and there is a parking lot for the building in the back.


8/11, time and location TBD: Art build (signs, posters, banners) for the event. 


8/12, 6pm, location TBD: Nonviolent direct action training for people who are planning to do that. 


8/13, time TBD, Wyatt Detention Center (950 High St, Central Falls): The action itself. 


Again, reading the form will give you a sense of the possibilities for participation in this action, and you do need to fill it out in order to participate. For updates and questions, and to sign up to get more information directly about this and other actions, email neveragainpvd at gmail dot com.

[IMAGE: People with their arms linked, facing the camera, in front of the fence and barbed wire gate of a brick detention facility. Cops are confronting the people, their backs to the camera.]

Climate Anxiety Counseling: Sankofa World Market/Knight Memorial Library, 8/8/18

Weather: Hot & steamy, with showers. The sun is almost unbearable.

Number of people: 3 stoppers, 2 walkbys

Number of hecklers: 0!

Pages of notes: 2

People who got the Peanuts reference: 1

People I’ve spoken with before, back for more: 1

Dogs seen: 4

Dogs pet: 3

Money raised for Environmental Justice League of RI: $0.25

 

Observations:

Another light-traffic day, with permission to post only one conversation. The market was slowish until about 4:15.

I also took a few shade breaks away from the booth, and may have lost some interlocutors because of that.

I recommended that a guy who thought there was “some debate about the science” start with the NOAA website.You can do this, too!

 

A conversation:

Instead of uniting us, it seems like [the President’s] trying to divide us. Whether you’re using color or economics, or because of your race—I don’t like what he’s doing with Spanish people.

Why do you think he’s doing that?

To keep our eyes off him and what he’s doing—a lot of underhanded stuff … All these kids in cages, I don’t think that’s right. They’re leaving their countries for a reason.

I also got opinions about the football players and all that. They’re just taking a stand—they have the right to say that they don’t want to stand up for the flag. These young Black men are getting killed.

 

P.S. I spoke with The Revelator about the climate anxieties counseling booth. Funnily enough, “revelator” is a role I invented for an alternate history.

Climate Anxiety Counseling: Last Day Downtown, Schedule Change, AMOR Grill-Off

Tomorrow (Friday, 6/15) will be my last day this season listening to climate anxieties in Kennedy Plaza/Burnside Park. I’ll be there 11am-2pm.

I’d planned to be there Saturday as well, but I’d rather go to the AMOR Grill-Off, a picnic benefit for Alianza para Movilizar Nuestra Resistencia/Alliance to Mobilize Our Resistance, a support and rapid response network offering (among other things) legal support for immigration and police brutality cases, mental health support, community response, and transportation and interpretation services.

If you want to go too, here are tickets. If you want to help the event happen, here are some donations the organizers could use.

And if you can’t come see me tomorrow, June 20th will start my stint at the Sankofa Market outside the Knight Memorial Library, 2-6pm on Wednesdays.

Actual History: Refusal 10 (May Day)

May Day as International Workers’ Day has its origins in the Haymarket Affair of 1886, a double display of state violence: on May 3rd, the third day of a general strike for an eight-hour work day, police protecting strikebreakers fired into a crowd of striking workers. At a mass meeting the following day, someone threw a bomb into a group of arresting officers, and the ensuing police raids and arrests ended with eight men sentenced to death. The state hanged four and later pardoned two; one took his own life in prison. Meanwhile, labor organizers continued their work, and in 1889 the Second International declared May 1st International Workers’ Day.

I also want to talk about another day in May.

Starting–but more about that in a minute–on May 1st, 1867, striking workers in Chicago shut down the economy of the city for a week to close loopholes in a law calling, already for the eight-hour workday. Industries in and around Chicago at that time included meatpacking, garment manufacturing, shipping, lumber processing, iron molding–so we can guess that fewer components were poured and fewer cuffs and collars sewn, that cargo ships sat at their moorings and that meat rotted on the packing lines. A week of people earning no money, drawing from the strike fund if they could. A week in which a city that bragged about how much it could produce, how fast it grew, couldn’t hold onto that pride and had–if only for a week, after which the strike collapse–to admit who made that pride possible.

The strike itself started on May 1st, but the work of making it possible started long before: in conversations, in the nurturing of loyalties, in meetings, in the gathering of resources, in the asking of questions, in the distribution of knowledge, in arguments, in shared meals, in the washing of clothes and the tending of children, in corners, in quiet, under the cover of machine sounds.

The fight for the eight-hour workday is a fight to be owned less than entirely. It says: we won’t let you use us up. It says: we are more than fuel.

*

My attention keeps turning to the failures to refuse in the May Day origin story: the police who, on May 3rd, didn’t have to but chose to fire into a crowd of striking workers. The jury. The hangman. Someone would probably have punished them, or tried to, if they refused, but that’s not identical with not having a choice. Examine your promises: who do they require you to hurt?

The May Day march in Providence starts at 3pm today, in Burnside Park. I’ll be walking with the Climate Justice and Just Transition bloc. Come too.