In RI? Testify 5/29 to support the Water Security Act!

The Water Security Act ensures that income level isn’t a barrier to safe, clean drinking water, and requires management plans to be accountable to the public. It will help prevent corporate control of water, protect water as a human right regardless of income, and start putting in place ways of handling water equitably and responsibly as the climate changes.

The hearing for this bill is on Wednesday, 5/29 at 4:30 pm. Can you come and testify? If not, can you call the senators on the RI Senate Committee on Environment and Agriculture (especially if one of them represents your district) and tell them why you want them to pass it?

Tell them how important healthy water and healthy public land are to your and your family’s life and well-being!

Tell them about problems you’ve had with drops in water quality or rises in water costs!

Tell them how the water system where you live has been affected, or could be affected, by flood, drought, sea level rise and erosion, high heat or storms!

Tell them how a Percentage of Income Payment Plan (where your water rates are a fixed percentage of your income) would reduce financial strains on you and/or your family!

Tell them why it’s important for water systems to be accountable to the public, and for water users to have input into how water is managed!

Tell them why it’s important for water systems to take into account economic, social and environmental justice in the communities they serve, when they’re making improvements and plans for the future!

I feel like often (and more recently), when we in the US have a need to interact with the people who govern us (to govern is to control, remember), we are trying to stop them from passing a horrible law. This is a chance to encourage the people who make the laws in Rhode Island to pass a law that’s really not too bad!

Here is the bill itself, RI S0820, so you can see what it requires from the towns/cities, agencies, departments, districts, etc. that are responsible for getting water to the people who use it. Please come testify if you can!

Climate Anxiety Counseling: Kennedy Plaza/Burnside Park, 7/1/17

Weather: Hot and muggy turning cool and muggy

Number of people: 6 stoppers, 3 walkbys

Number of hecklers: 0!

Pages of notes: 7

Pictures taken without permission: 1

Dogs seen: 2

Dogs pet: 0

Money raised for Environmental Justice League of RI: $3.11

 

Observations:

A thinner crowd today in Kennedy Plaza and the park overall, and fewer people talking with me.

Lots of people wanted to tell me their ideas about things today. A former printer and sign-letterer and self-declared Trump voter talked to me for around an hour today (mostly to, not with) and ended up by outlining his idea for taking money from wealthier towns and giving to poorer towns to pay for health care.

Much less overt police activity today. I noticed one car parked at the Dorrance Street end of Kennedy Plaza at 4:22, but it could have been there for much longer.

I ran into someone who talked with me earlier in the season and I was able to give him some information I forgot to give him the first time, but he also asked me, “How are your anxieties?” and I didn’t tell him how grateful I was that he asked me, so: C, I am so, so grateful. And the moral of this story is that even when you get a second chance, sometimes you need a third one; and the moral of this story is that so much more could happen if we all had and used the chance to know each other, slowly, over time.

 

Some conversations:

I have United Healthcare. It’s not easy with this Affordable Care Act—a lot of people can’t get health care at all. You shouldn’t force people to get health insurance. But this what they’re doing, it’s the baby with the bathwater. Adjust it, sure, it could use adjustments, but it seems like it’s gonna make it worse. Seems like every word out of Trump’s mouth is a lie.

What would you like to see in a president? What would make you want to vote for someone?

It seems like they all kinda lie a lot. They make promises and they know they can’t keep it, they have no intention of keeping it. Donald Trump lied about his belief system, and a lot of evangelical Christians bought into his lies. My old pastor is in Dallas, I still follow what he’s doing, and I’m shocked at how much he supports him. People hate Hillary so much that they become blinded. Hate blinds us, we become blinded. [Donald Trump] believes greed is good …

*

I think it’s terrible, I think the climate change is terrible. I don’t know much about it. I’m an ex-garbageman, and I saw how in New York what they do with all their rubbish—the just drop it in the ocean! That can’t be good for the climate change. [Holds up the cap to his water bottle.] Plastic. Plastic will be here for millions of years. It’s the only thing we’re gonna leave that will be here for millions of years. I ran a rubbish business for nearly 30 years, and I came up with the recycling program [for my company]. I started with cardboard, paper, newspaper, and I made them $1.2 million in the first year. I liked my work. I came up with the idea. They didn’t stick with it–$1.2 million was not enough for them to keep the recyclable part of it … I hate [climate change], I don’t like it, and I’d wanna fight it if I can.

*

[These two are friends with each other, and also friends with me. They came up together.]

Person 1: [Person 2] and I were just over there smoking a cigarette, and I was thinking about the policies of smoke and secondhand smoke, and the recent criminalization of smoking.* Whose interests is that in? Smoke is so complicated. The people who manufacture cigarettes are the worst people in the world. Cigarettes are targeted toward the most vulnerable people—I was reading how they’re targeted toward queer youth. They’re simultaneously really bad and really important to many people’s survival. [My partner] always carries a pack of cigarettes and they’re mostly to smoke, but they always give one to anyone who asks. It’s awful to be addicted—I’m not addicted, I don’t smoke that often—but it also feels like an act of resistance [to smoke and drop the butt], even though I’m complicit in the destruction of this greenery, against this demand that I take part in beautifying this space, this system of beauty that’s a way of reifying whiteness and [keeping] this park for the rich.

Person 2: And the law is directly aimed at people who are waiting for the bus.

Person 1: Which directly impacts poor people of color and people with disabilities. Whose environment is it? Why should I protect the environment for rich people? The law isn’t there to protect you, it’s there to target you.

Person 2: [I’m worried about] constant expansion. Specifically, “Oh, we’ll just add one more thing, that won’t detract from the wildlife.” Until you have a million new things and then you have a city. My older brother lives in [REDACTED] and there’s a little bit of swampland in our backyard, and the neighbors dumped construction refuse into the mineral spring that feeds into it. It’s turning into a meadow slowly. When I was up there, I went around collecting all the garbage, but I know other houses on my block have been actively littering. The biggest thing I found in there were these kids’ motorized fake plastic motorcycles. Bottles and cans, lawn stuff, like the tubing for gutters—just a ton of stuff …

Person 1: Who does that?

 

*Doctor’s note: There’s been a smoking ban in the park for a while, and there is now a ban on smoking outside it but near the fence.

Actual History: Refusal 10 (May Day)

May Day as International Workers’ Day has its origins in the Haymarket Affair of 1886, a double display of state violence: on May 3rd, the third day of a general strike for an eight-hour work day, police protecting strikebreakers fired into a crowd of striking workers. At a mass meeting the following day, someone threw a bomb into a group of arresting officers, and the ensuing police raids and arrests ended with eight men sentenced to death. The state hanged four and later pardoned two; one took his own life in prison. Meanwhile, labor organizers continued their work, and in 1889 the Second International declared May 1st International Workers’ Day.

I also want to talk about another day in May.

Starting–but more about that in a minute–on May 1st, 1867, striking workers in Chicago shut down the economy of the city for a week to close loopholes in a law calling, already for the eight-hour workday. Industries in and around Chicago at that time included meatpacking, garment manufacturing, shipping, lumber processing, iron molding–so we can guess that fewer components were poured and fewer cuffs and collars sewn, that cargo ships sat at their moorings and that meat rotted on the packing lines. A week of people earning no money, drawing from the strike fund if they could. A week in which a city that bragged about how much it could produce, how fast it grew, couldn’t hold onto that pride and had–if only for a week, after which the strike collapse–to admit who made that pride possible.

The strike itself started on May 1st, but the work of making it possible started long before: in conversations, in the nurturing of loyalties, in meetings, in the gathering of resources, in the asking of questions, in the distribution of knowledge, in arguments, in shared meals, in the washing of clothes and the tending of children, in corners, in quiet, under the cover of machine sounds.

The fight for the eight-hour workday is a fight to be owned less than entirely. It says: we won’t let you use us up. It says: we are more than fuel.

*

My attention keeps turning to the failures to refuse in the May Day origin story: the police who, on May 3rd, didn’t have to but chose to fire into a crowd of striking workers. The jury. The hangman. Someone would probably have punished them, or tried to, if they refused, but that’s not identical with not having a choice. Examine your promises: who do they require you to hurt?

The May Day march in Providence starts at 3pm today, in Burnside Park. I’ll be walking with the Climate Justice and Just Transition bloc. Come too.

House Bill No. 1203 in North Dakota

Here is the text of North Dakota House Bill No. 1203, which would make it legal for North Dakota drivers to hit people with their cars if those people are walking in the road. The articles I’ve seen about this state that the bill is a response to the civil disobedience of water protectors at Standing Rock.

Here is the email I just sent to the members of the Transportation Committee, through whom (if I understand correctly) the bill would have to pass:

Dear [Representative]:

I’m writing to ask you to refuse to advance Mr. Kempenich’s House Bill No. 1203, which would protect North Dakota drivers from the consequences of injuring or killing pedestrians with their cars.

I saw on the legislature page that you have children and grandchildren. Imagine saying to your child, or imagine your constituents saying to their children who they were teaching how to drive, “If you hit and kill someone, if it’s under such-and-such circumstances, you won’t get in trouble.” Once you’ve said that, does it really matter what the “such-and-such circumstances” are? Wouldn’t you then be saying that when they’re driving, they don’t need to care about other people’s safety–or that they can be the person who decides who lives and who dies, who’s widowed or orphaned,  who’s disabled for life? Are those the drivers you want on North Dakota roads, or any roads?

Although I don’t live in your state, I was moved to write to you because it’s possible that this bill could set a precedent for others. It is inhumane and dangerous. When House Bill No. 1203 comes before you, I urge you and the other members of the Transportation Committee to stop it from going any further.

Thank you,

Kate Schapira

Providence, RI

*

The Transportation Committee meets on Thursdays and Fridays. If you have a moment tonight or tomorrow, please call them or write them a letter–feel free to use mine or to create your own.Please let them know that people outside the state are watching this, and reject it utterly and with disgust.

An Alternate History by Rolando Huerta: 12/18/15

Earlier in the year, I asked some writers I know if they’d be willing to write an alternate history for this project in response to a climate anxiety I’d gathered at the booth. You can read some of the other ones by Rachel Schapira, Rachel Schapira again, Ethan Robinson, Mia Hooper and Janaya Kizzie. If you think you might like to write one, let me know. This one just came in, and is by Rolando Huerta; the date at the top refers to the date the story was posted.

12/18/15

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT

WESTERN DISTRICT OF RHODE ISLAND

EASTERN DIVISION

 

SARAH RICHARDS-MALKOVICH and .   Docket No. 1111-ACV-192735-JCSAC

TAYLOR MALKOVICH, IV,        .

.

Plaintiffs,              .   Providence, Rhode Island

.   Monday, July 9, 2057

  1. .   9:00 a.m.

.

STATE OF RHODE ISLAND        .

DEPT. CLIMATE CONTROL,       .

DEPT. GEOENGINEERING, et al,.

Defendants.              .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .  .

 

VOLUME I

TRANSCRIPT OF TRIAL

BEFORE THE HONORABLE JOANNE C. SOLOMON

UNITED STATES DISTRICT JUDGE, and a jury.

 

APPEARANCES:

 

For the Plaintiffs:          Nixon & Carmicle, S.C.

By: MAXSON R. CONNOLLY, ESQ.

42 East Midland Street, Suite 18

Warwick, RI 02887

(411) 929-9911

 

For the Defendants:          State Attorney General’s Office

By: ANSOLM CLARK SABRAHAR, ESQ.

JOHN P. FONTELLE, ESQ.

P.O. Box 78570

Warwick, RI 02887-7857

(411) 294-9544

 

Court Recorder:              Carmen DuPont

District Court Clerk’s Office

1 Exchange St, Room 320

Providence, RI 02903

(411) 244-5156

 

Transcription Service:       Blankpunkt Reporting Co.

801 North Verdaccio Street

Providence, RI 02907

(411) 722-7428

 

Proceedings recorded by electronic sound recording;

transcript produced by transcription service.

 

INDEX

 

OPENING STATEMENT:                                     Page

 

On behalf of the Plaintiffs, by Mr. Connolly            3

On behalf of the Defendants, by Mr. Sabrahar           12

 

Further

WITNESSES FOR THE     Direct Cross Redirect Recross Redirect

PLAINTIFFS:

Bernadette A. Clay       25     49

Louis Fishbourne         70     92     75     129

 

WITNESSES FOR THE

DEFENDANTS:

Malcom Morgan           102   156 (Voir Dire)

Simon S. Moody           108   177

MOTION: Mr. Sabrahar   111 Denied   112

MOTION: Ms. Kennelly   118 Denied   115

 

EXHIBITS:                                     Marked Received

 

1 – Morgan affidavit and extra damages         29     29

summary

2 – Additional extra damages list             38     40

3 – Performance appraisals, 2053 – 2056,       60     64

Smythe-Richards

4 – Performance appraisals, 2047 – 2056,       75     —

Moody

 

ARGUMENT: Mr. Connolly                               165

RESPONSE: Mr. Sabrahar                               172

 

 

PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND, MONDAY, JULY 9, 2057, 9:00 A.M.

(Call to Order of the Court.)

THE COURT: Good morning, everyone. Let’s call in the jury, unless there are matters to consider first. Mr. Connolly?

  1. CONNOLLY: No, Your Honor, we’re ready.
  2. SABRAHAR: We have nothing to take up right now, Your Honor.

THE COURT: Good. Mr. Bailiff, please bring the jury from their waiting room.

(Proceedings continued in the presence of the jury.)

THE COURT: Good morning, ladies and gentlemen. Our first order of business will be brief statements of what this case is all about by Mr. Connolly and Mr. Sabrahar, whom you met yesterday during the jury selection process. Mr. Connolly will speak to you first.

Please proceed, Mr. Connolly.

  1. CONNOLLY: Thank you, Your Honor.

Ladies and gentlemen, as you know, this is an unusual case, in that we are here to decide whether the long accepted Weather Modification Act should continue to be implemented in the State of Rhode Island. Moreover, we are here to decide whether the State of Rhode Island is directly responsible for the tragic death of a Ms. Elizabeth Malkovich, eleven year old daughter of Sarah and Taylor Malkovich.

Particularly in question is whether the release of cloud-seeding aerosols, such as silver iodide, by Rhode Island’s Departments of Climate Control and Geoengineering directly or indirectly contributed to flooding in West Providence, which occurred at approximately 10:30 AM on the morning of September 5, 2056. This flash flood left thousands without a home, and even more people were left without running water and electricity; it caused over one hundred and fifty million dollars in damage. Worse yet, it took young Ms. Malkovich’s life. She was trapped and drowned at her school that morning. The very building housing teachers educating her on the Global Climate Control Initiative, and the importance of weather modification, Rhode Island’s premier charter school, the Casey-Anne Institute, became this child’s watery grave. And how compelling it is that we be here this morning to discuss this matter and reach the right verdict.

The long since tenured practice of cloud seeding was publicly instituted at the height of our climate change anxiety in the twenty-twenties, 2025 to be exact, and overturned the Clean Water Act of the twentieth century. It has been said that the Weather Modification Act of 2025 is responsible for over 10,000 accidental flooding deaths in the U.S.A. every year since its passing. It’s time that once and for all those responsible for such senseless and negligent policies of death, have their day in court, and that the State of Rhode Island suspend its implementation of the Weather Modification Act of 2025. Further, that restitution and damages be sought and awarded to the Plaintiff, may the jury reach the right decision.

We should do this for Ms. Elizabeth Malkovich, who did not deserve to die at the tender age of eleven, especially, at the hands of those who are tasked with protecting each and every one of us. We should do this not only for the Malkovich family, present today, but for all those parents not present today, who want to see their own children outlive themselves. Members of the Jury, I do not know whether any of you have children, but I do, and I do not want the Rhode Island Departments of Climate Control and Geoengineering to kill them, not by intent, nor by accident, and certainly not by negligent policy.

 

  1. CONNOLLY: I’d like to call Ms. Clay.

THE COURT: Raise your right hand, madam, and the clerk will administer the oath.

BERNADETTE A. CLAY, PLAINTIFFS’ WITNESS, SWORN

THE CLERK: State and spell your name for the record.

THE WITNESS: Bernadette A. Clay, C-L-A-Y.

THE CLERK: Be seated.

DIRECT EXAMINATION

BY MR. CONNOLLY:

  1. Do you know either of the plaintiffs in this case, Mr. Taylor Malkovich or Mrs. Richards-Malkovich?
  2. Yes, I do know them both.
  3. And what is your relationship?
  4. I taught their daughter, Liz, third grade calculus at Casey-Anne.
  5. How long have you been teaching at the Casey-Anne Institute?
  6. For twenty-three years now. Yes, I’ve been teaching at Casey-Anne since 2034.
  7. Was there anything unusual about the week of September 5, 2056?
  8. Well, yes. On that Monday the 4th [9/4/56], an overwhelming majority, ninety-five per cent, of our students, and ninety per cent of all Rhode Islanders, as I recall, voted for sunny weather, not rain. We were supposed to have [long pause] sunny weather all week.

[mixed voices]